The coolest things to do in Lisbon

Search for bargains at Feira da Ladra

the coolest things to do in lisbon The coolest things to do in Lisbon feira da ladra 300x225

What is it? This is the Lisbon equivalent to Madrid’s El Rastro or London’s Portobello Market. Feira da Ladra started in the 13th century and moved around town, before setting up camp at its current Campo de Santa Clara location in 1903.

Why go? If you enjoy pottering around flea markets when you’re on holiday, go to Feira da Ladra. There’s a bit of everything there, from socks to second-hand books to vintage silk handkerchiefs every Tuesday and Saturday.

Try the best Portuguese food at Time Out Market Lisboa

the coolest things to do in lisbon The coolest things to do in Lisbon Portuguese food at Time Out

What is it? More than 40 spaces with the leading representatives in all the food categories that help make Lisbon what it is – and tastes – all together under one roof.

Why go? Have you ever heard of curated burgers? Curated nigiri? Curated pizzas, sandwiches or even curated cod? Probably not. After all, Time Out Market is the first market in the world where everything has been chosen, tasted and tested (with four or five stars, and not one star less) by an independent panel of city experts: Time Out’s own journalists and critics. It has over 40 restaurants, a shop selling Portuguese products, a cooking academy, a bar, a club and a showroom. Definitely an unmissable stop.

See the sunset at

the coolest things to do in lisbon The coolest things to do in Lisbon sunset at Park 300x143

What is it? This sprawling rooftop bar on a multi-storey car park at the south-western corner of the Bairro Alto gets packed on warm evenings.

Why go? Okay, it sounds weird. But at Park, drinks are available on the sixth floor, so you’ll be far from the actual cars. Phones at the ready – the view it has over Lisbon is one of the most instagrammables, as are the cocktails. Plus, there are usually DJs to liven things up. A relative newcomer, this sprawling rooftop bar on a multi-storey car park at the south-western corner of the Bairro Alto gets packed on warm evenings. Beautiful young things chat amid giant pot plants, swaying to a DJ-driven soundtrack of jazz, soul and funk.

Take a forest bath in Monsanto Park

the coolest things to do in lisbon The coolest things to do in Lisbon Monsanto Park 300x191

What is it? How about a public park like Central Park, do you have one? We do.

Why go? We do. Actually, we have a park that’s three times the size of that New-York icon – yes, three times. Walking, running, riding a bike or skating, have a picnic, take photographs, drawing or dating are some of the suggestions we have to pass the time in this green field that’s so big that you lose sight of where it begins and where it ends.

Spend the day — and night — at Casa Independentethe coolest things to do in lisbon The coolest things to do in Lisbon at Casa Independente 300x211

What is it? Casa Independente opened 
in 2012, just as the city centre square, Largo do Intendente, was becoming a destination
 of choice for a night out on the town.

Why go? In a decaying mansion that has housed all manner of clubs and associations over the past century or so, this is the latest (and probably the liveliest) incarnation. The large front ‘Tiger Room’ hosts gigs and DJ sets, there are various small rooms that are good for a chat or a spot of work on your tablet, and the café and back patio are great places to relax.

Go for a drink at Rive-Rougethe coolest things to do in lisbon The coolest things to do in Lisbon Rive Rouge 300x225

What is it? You can find Rive-Rouge, the heir to Lux Frágil, at Time Out Market.

Why go? The design is unusual with red lighting, metallic structures, high tables and benches here. It’s not massive, but don’t despair, there’s still plenty of space for booty-shaking when the music starts.

Lear about History of Art at Calouste Gulbenkian Museum

the coolest things to do in lisbon The coolest things to do in Lisbon Calouste Gulbenkian Museum 300x173

What is it? One of Europe’s leading fine arts museums, with exhibits dating from 2000 BC to the early 20th century.

Why go? Save time for the final room and its breathtaking glass and metal art nouveau jewellery by René Lalique. Audio-guides are available in English, French, Spanish and Portuguese to help you get the most from the experience. There are also excellent temporary exhibitions, with pieces lent by institutions around the world. Downstairs is an art library (which often hosts midday classical recitals on Sundays), an excellent café and a small gift shop.

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